Monday, 23 November 2009

One shot film



Typical youtube quality.

Sunday, 22 November 2009

The E-sting



My favourite piece of work.

Some college work

The third picture is the film poster I mentioned a few posts ago - The End Of The World, which took me very little time, and produced surprisingly good results!

The second is a piece of typography I produced, with the words Misery, Victim and Ventilation. Most of it is made up of text. The blood and the person are made from Victim, the drips at the back are made of Misery, and the Ventilation is simply a vent. A bit of a cop-out maybe, but it works!

The drips and the water effect were both produced by experimenting with photocopying, specifically what happens when you move what you're photocopying as it's photocopying.

The first picture is a Saul Bass inspired take on a film poster for Iron Man. It's not got all the text on, as I never got round to finishing it.



Tuesday, 17 November 2009

The Meal Project

If you've seen me wandering around with a camera taking pictures of lectures and things, that's because for today - tuesday 17th - I'm taking pictures for the meal project, which is meant to involve taking a picture every minute of each hour of the day. I say meant to, a picture a minute is a little impractical for me, seeing as 1 - I'd have to stop every minute on my ride to Uni up the big hill that is ilkeston road, which I don't want to do, and more importantly, my camera won't hold that many images.

I'll probably end up with around 400, hopefully 600.

I'll be sure to post a few up, some of them are quite interesting already!

Tuesday, 10 November 2009



This is the single best commercial you will ever see. It was never allowed on TV, but you can't really see why. Give it a watch, you'll like it!

Monday, 9 November 2009

Hoverbike

After much procrastination, here is my pixilation video:

Untitled from Revolver on Vimeo.

Youtube video uploading

Well, I'm getting round to uploading my video to youtube. After the tutorial with Simon, he suggested looking at the proper sizes that youtube uses, to minimize the loss of quality youtube causes with compressing. I found a useful link - http://www.lafcpug.org/Tutorials/basic_you_tube.html

It tells you about what codec youtube uses, and what size. To get the most from youtube, export your videos with the correct size and the appropriate codecs!

And here - http://www.vimeo.com/help/compression - is the same for vimeo. Vimeo's a little less mainstream than youtube, which is good because you get a hell of a lot less shit on there.

Finally - http://www.google.com/support/forum/p/blogger/thread?tid=53c9daac1f8dde71&hl=en - this link tells you how to correctly embed videos on blogger with regards to the sizing. It turns out that copying the youtube embed code will produce a video that's too wide for your blog, so this link tells you how to sort that out.

Tuesday, 3 November 2009

Wet

Dance or leave...

Well, I was never going to take the dance option whilst soaking wet.

Design Process - TL;DR - Idea = :D no idea = >(

Another thing we were told to do... write up our design processes.

Well, one notable thing about how I work is, I need an idea. I can't do anything without one. I call it idea stagnation, because that's what it is - lack of motion.
I don't get on well with brainstorms. I don't like doing them because I don't come up with many ideas like that. It helps a little bit, a bit like one person pushing a car.
Where does the idea come from?
I don't just want to say, it turns up out of nowhere, but that's pretty much it. I can't imagine it working in any other way.
It's sort of a combination of what I know I can do, what I think I could manage, what's already out there, and a bit of je ne sais quoi.

An example would be the ident project in college.
My first idea was to have a sort of spoof of the simpson's Battle Seizure Robots. I decided that drawing the robots was out of my reach skills-wise, and then switched to another idea, which was a bomb-disposal squad/sort of parody of 24. I wasn't too sure about this idea, being that it was quite heavy on the drawing work again.
Then, I thought of my third, final idea, which I thought went better with the E4's mood, which is slightly dark and strange, but slightly funny too. The idea was to have TVs that had been thrown away onto a tip to turn themselves on and play E4 idents. I'll have to get round to uploading that to here, I think it's my best piece of work by far.

An example of idea stagnation is the movie poster project. This project had a huge run-up, where we had to research film posters beforehand. I chose to do a sci-fi type of film, but I think the brief was too broad, which is another cause of idea stagnation. I ended up pretty much doing the poster on the final day of hand in - it was called 'The End of The World' and was a photoshopped version of a picture I took from a plane of a view of Warsaw, to look like the whole place was on fire. I think it turned out well, considering I think it took me half an hour from start to finish, or something ridiculous like that.


If I've got a good idea, I tend to work pretty fast. It's sort of consuming. It occupies my thoughts a lot, so I'm constantly thinking of ways to improve it. The E4 ident is the best example again - I work in a supermarket, and I actually came up with the idea for the TVs whilst sat at the till with nothing to do. I quickly drew a rough storyboard on reciept paper. It went through a couple of revisions, the original being that broken screens would heal like skin, and after being possessed by the E4 ident, would become broken again.
I was advised by my tutor to use AfterEffects for animation instead of flash, which was my usual medium for animation. This was pivotal - the finished product as it would've been in flash would've been no where near as good. However, as I had to use more still images, I found that making cracks in the TV screens disappear would be too difficult for me.

I think that storyboarding is an important part of designing something like animation. Without knowing where to go, I tend to head for the end too quickly.
Using a rough storyboard is good because it doesn't take too long to produce, so it allows you to change the idea without losing a lot of hard work.


I'm not sure what else to say at this point, other than look at the time!
I hope I'm not the only person who works this way, but at the same time, it would be cool as well :P

Jippii Golf

http://www.jippii.lv/?st4w0ZE1XsQBavszuq7wTEbJb

And it is written, Tovijah 21:17, 'I am the lord of Jippii Golf, and all who oppose me shall fail.'

Seriously, it's in there, look it up yourself.

Update as of 17/02/2011

Jippii has since updated all of its sites to the newest format, thus removing the legendary Minigolf game. And so, I retire (mostly) undefeated.

Bad layouts

Admittedly, I've not tried as hard with this as I could have... partially because I didn't remember to look until not that long ago.
Bad layout design is pretty tough to come across in the print industry because having good layouts is the whole point. However, I can think of a good example of layout design that's always nibbled away at me when I've seen it. Page spreads. Occasionally you'll get a magazine feature that covers two pages. I mean, with a picture that goes across both, or a table or some other type of layout, where it seems it's been designed as a page of a3 rather than two a4s. This always results in that annoying little bit of picture or text you can't see because it's right in the spine of the magazine. Frustrating, especially when you see a picture you want to scan in that covers two pages, and the part in the middle is always lost. I guess it doesn't relate much to typography, but it occurs with type too.